Revealing Stereotypes: Evidence from Immigrants in Schools

January 21, 2019
By: Alberto Alesina (Department of Economics, Harvard University, IGIER Bocconi, NBER and CEPR); Michela Carlana (Harvard Kennedy School and IZA); Eliana La Ferrara (Department of Economics, IGIER and LEAP, Bocconi University);Paolo Pinotti (Department of Social and Political Sciences at Bocconi University, DONDENA, and Fondazione Rodolfo Debenedetti)
Abstract: If individuals become aware of their stereotypes, do they change their behavior? We study this question in the context of teachers’ bias in grading immigrants and native children in middle schools. Teachers give lower grades to immigrant students compared to natives who have the same performance on standardized, blindly-graded tests. We then relate differences in grading to teachers’ stereotypes, elicited through an Implicit Association Test (IAT). We find that math teachers with stronger stereotypes give lower grades to immigrants compared to natives with the same performance. Literature teachers do not differentially grade immigrants based on their own stereotypes. Finally, we share teachers’ own IAT score with them, randomizing the timing of disclosure around the date on which they assign term grades. All teachers informed of their stereotypes before term grading increase grades assigned to immigrants. Revealing stereotypes may be a powerful intervention to decrease discrimination, but it may also induce a reaction from individuals who were not acting in a biased way.
Keywords: immigrants, teachers, implicit stereotypes, IAT, bias in grading
JEL: I24 J15
URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:crm:wpaper:1817&r=ltv
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On the Possibility of Progress

January 21, 2019
By: Romer, Paul M. (New York University)
Abstract: Paul M. Romer delivered his Prize Lecture on 8 December 2018 at the Aula Magna, Stockholm University.
Keywords: long-term growth;
JEL: O00
URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ris:nobelp:2018_004&r=ltv

Strikes, Employee Workplace Representation, Unionism, and Industrial Relations Quality in European Establishments

January 21, 2019
By: John T. AddisonPaulino Teixeira
Abstract: Using cross-country data, this paper investigates the relationship between workplace representation and strikes. Works councils are associated with reduced strike activity. However, where union members make up a majority of works councillors, such union-dominated councils experience greater strike activity than do their counterparts with minority union membership, and also more strikes than establishments with union workplace representation where union members are in a minority. Dissonance between the parties as to the state of industrial relations is associated with elevated strike activity. Finally, union density at the workplace, if not the presence of collective bargaining, is directly associated with strike incidence.
Keywords: works councils, employee representation, union density, level of collective bargaining, industrial relations quality/dissonance, strike incidence, strike duration, strike frequency, strike intensity
JEL: J51 J52 J53 J83
URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ces:ceswps:_7360&r=ltv

Inequality and Well-Being

January 21, 2019
By: Borooah, Vani
Abstract: This chapter investigates a neglected area in the study of human development relating differences in human development between social groups in a country. Failure to take account of such inter-group inequalities might lead one to exaggerate a country’s developmental achievements. Conversely, one would get a more accurate picture of a country’s achievements with respect to human development only after one had taken cognisance of the fact that the fruits of development were unequally distributed between its various communities. There is a further issue. Not only are developmental fruits unequally distributed between groups, but these fruits may be unequally distributed within the groups. This chapter uses the methodology of “equity adjusted achievement” to compute human development indices and “extended” human development indices for a number of social groups in India.
Keywords: Inequality, Well Being, Social Groups
JEL: I31 I32
URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:pra:mprapa:90554&r=ltv